7 days after the floods, still trapped at home

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood of Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood of Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Nguyen Thi Hoe has been stuck in her flooded house for an entire week with no running water, no electricity and three restless children. She’s about to go crazy with boredom.

“I feel like I’m in prison,” said Hoe, whose street is still under three feet (a meter) of water and reeks of sewage. “I heard it might rain again and we’ll be stuck here even longer. I can’t take it anymore!”

By Thursday, most of Hanoi had dried off after the worst rains in 35 years flooded neighborhoods across the capital, where 22 people died. But a handful of the hardest-hit areas are still inundated, including the Tan Mai district, where 2,800 houses remained flooded.

Hoe, 40, hasn’t gone outside for seven days. Her husband wades through the filthy water on their lane to fetch clean water and other supplies.

They’ve only had enough water for cooking and brushing their teeth — no showers, no laundry. Dirty clothes are piling up.

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood as a man pushes a boat in Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood as a man pushes a boat in Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

Hoe’s 17-year-old daughter, Pham Thi Nhung, finally ventured off to school after five days and came home with a rash on her legs after wading through the filthy water.

“It’s so boring in the house, but going outside is even more terrible,” Nhung said. “My exams are coming and I missed five days of school. What if I fail?”

More than 32 inches (81 centimeters) of rain fell in Hanoi over the last week, with much of it lashing the city over the weekend. Heavy rains also struck nearby northern provinces and parts of central Vietnam.

In all, 93 people died.

By Thursday, most of Hanoi was dry again, and the waters were even starting to recede in Tan Mai, a low-lying neighborhood that gets inundated with runoff from other sections of the capital.

With their toilets not working, many neighbors have been tossing buckets of waste off their balconies to get it out of their houses.

“I’ve never seen anything so disgusting in all my life,” Hoe said. “I’ve never smelled anything so awful.”

Some Tan Mai entrepreneurs crafted boats out of plastic foam and planks of wood and were ferrying people in and out of the neighborhood for a round-trip fee of $3 — a full day’s salary for many people here.

Nevertheless, some were willing to splurge to avoid setting foot in the scummy water.

The water level near Tran Quang Trung’s house had fallen enough to allow him to bathe on the sidewalk — his first bath in a week.

His bathroom was still under three feet (one meter) of water, but Trung, dressed in just a pair of running shorts, cheerfully sudsed himself up with soap and rinsed off using a bucketful of water he managed to bring home.

“This feels fantastic,” he said. “I’m so happy, I don’t care if anyone peeks at me.”

Associated Press writer Vu Tien Hong contributed to this report.

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hxIa8SlpURJY2Ei0bTV5vxvwUkZAD949FO100

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US provides funds for HIV/AIDS clinic in HCM City

VietNamNet Bridge – A US-funded outpatient clinic for people living with HIV/AIDS opened in district 9, Ho Chi Minh City, on November 5.

The clinic, supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) under the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), aims to enlarge the service system for HIV care and treatment.

It will provide a comprehensive service, including preventative care, counselling and voluntary testing services, antiretroviral treatment and home-based care to those living with HIV/AIDS, both in district 9 as well as other neighbouring areas.

A similar PEPFAR-supported clinic opened in district 6 of HCM City in 2005, having received more than 13,000 people, provided voluntary counseling and testing services to nearly 4,000 people and offered antiretroviral treatment to over 800 patients since it was established.

It has also cared for and supported over 2,300 adults, orphans and vulnerable children who live with the effects of HIV/AIDS.

The PEPFAR programme has granted 232 million USD to fund HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support services in Vietnam since 2004. The PEPFAR budget for Vietnam for the 2008 fiscal year is 88 million USD. The PEPFAR programme for the next five years was approved by the US Congress with a budget of 48 billion USD for the global battle against the HIV/AIDS epidemic, as well as the fight against the spread of tuberculosis and malaria.

(Source: VNA)

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2008/11/812205/