Agriculture production still paralyzed after flood

VietNamNet Bridge – Vegetables and other crops have been lost because of the flood. Farms in the suburb areas of Hanoi have become idle as poultry and animals have either been killed, or bargained away by the owners. The agriculture production remains paralyzed ten days after the flood.

The field without farmers

The inundated field in Ung Hoa district in Hanoi

Rice and vegetable fields in Thanh Oai, Ung Hoa and Hoai Duc districts, which are located along the Highway No. 21, were seen 30-50 cm under water on November 9. From a distance, one would only see a vast sea, while he could not tell the difference if it was a rice field, a vegetable field, a pond, or a lake.

Van Con and Song Phuong, the vegetable granaries in Hoai Duc district, have become empty.

Showing the basket of damaged cabbage, Bui Thi Yen in Van Con commune related that in the days of heavy rain, she and her husband still had to work in the vegetable field, as she feared that the heavy rain would damage the produce. Yen decided to bring vegetables to sell in the inner city to get more money than selling right at the field. She and many other households here have to drive by bicycle under the heavy rain.

Yen said that she dared not to hire pick-ups to carry the produce, which would cost her VND 150,000. She said that she has to save up money, because she has lost much money due to the flood.

The vegetable commune of Van Noi in Dong Anh district has also been suffering from the flood. Tran Thi Hop, Deputy Chairwoman of Van Noi People’s Committee, said that Van Noi has completely lost 120 ha out of 150 ha.

The local residents said that if the water goes down in one week, they will begin growing short term vegetable crops. This means that the vegetable communes will only be able to provide produce to Hanoi in 20 days.

Fish, fowls gone, leaving farmers in sorrow

Quang Dac Hop in Van Con commune in Hoai Duc district related that he previously planned to sell 500 chickens in November 2008, but he was unable to when the flood broke out. Hop said that he couldn’t do anything to rescue the chickens, leaving them to die in the flood.

Bang, Van Con Commune’s Party Committee Secretary, also complained that he has lost nearly all of the 500 chickens he owns in the flood. Bang said that the dead chickens were sold at VND 20,000/1.5kg.

Chuong My district, one of the most severely stricken areas with 2,500 ha inundated, has reported that 60,030 chickens and 657 pigs have been killed.

Hundreds of fowl farms (3,000-10,000 chickens a farm) in Phuong Tien, Nam Phuong Tien, and Thuy Xuan Tien, have all been flooded. These are the chickens which farmers raise for Charoen Pokph and Company. Currently, some 100,000 chickens are being raised on boats or on hills.

Son Tay City is not listed among the severely stricken areas of Hanoi. However, Tran Van Chien, Chairman of Co Dong Cooperative, said that nearly ten pig and fowl farms have been relocated. Some 100 pigs and 2,000 chickens have been killed, while others have been bargained away.

Chien said on November 9 that though the water has been going down gradually, 12 farms had been isolated. Vehicles could not carry feed to the farms as the roads remained between half a metre and one metre under water.

“I have never seen such a heavy rain in the dry season. Farms are now still struggling to repair the flood damage, while no official figure about damages has been released,” Chien said.

Aquaculture proves to have suffered the most in the flood. A household breeding fish in Thanh Tri district complained that they had lost several hundreds millions VND. The north saw 27,000 ha of aquaculture complete lost with the flood, of which Hanoi has lost 9,000 ha. A lot of farmers have suffered financially from the flood, unable to collect any income.

Nguyen Nga

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/biz/2008/11/812968/

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7 days after the floods, still trapped at home

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood of Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood of Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Nguyen Thi Hoe has been stuck in her flooded house for an entire week with no running water, no electricity and three restless children. She’s about to go crazy with boredom.

“I feel like I’m in prison,” said Hoe, whose street is still under three feet (a meter) of water and reeks of sewage. “I heard it might rain again and we’ll be stuck here even longer. I can’t take it anymore!”

By Thursday, most of Hanoi had dried off after the worst rains in 35 years flooded neighborhoods across the capital, where 22 people died. But a handful of the hardest-hit areas are still inundated, including the Tan Mai district, where 2,800 houses remained flooded.

Hoe, 40, hasn’t gone outside for seven days. Her husband wades through the filthy water on their lane to fetch clean water and other supplies.

They’ve only had enough water for cooking and brushing their teeth — no showers, no laundry. Dirty clothes are piling up.

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood as a man pushes a boat in Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

A woman walks at a flooded street in Tan Mai neighborhood as a man pushes a boat in Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008. The Vietnamese capital is still pumping floodwaters from city streets and homes after the heaviest rainfall in 35 years swamped large areas of the country and killed at least 92. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

Hoe’s 17-year-old daughter, Pham Thi Nhung, finally ventured off to school after five days and came home with a rash on her legs after wading through the filthy water.

“It’s so boring in the house, but going outside is even more terrible,” Nhung said. “My exams are coming and I missed five days of school. What if I fail?”

More than 32 inches (81 centimeters) of rain fell in Hanoi over the last week, with much of it lashing the city over the weekend. Heavy rains also struck nearby northern provinces and parts of central Vietnam.

In all, 93 people died.

By Thursday, most of Hanoi was dry again, and the waters were even starting to recede in Tan Mai, a low-lying neighborhood that gets inundated with runoff from other sections of the capital.

With their toilets not working, many neighbors have been tossing buckets of waste off their balconies to get it out of their houses.

“I’ve never seen anything so disgusting in all my life,” Hoe said. “I’ve never smelled anything so awful.”

Some Tan Mai entrepreneurs crafted boats out of plastic foam and planks of wood and were ferrying people in and out of the neighborhood for a round-trip fee of $3 — a full day’s salary for many people here.

Nevertheless, some were willing to splurge to avoid setting foot in the scummy water.

The water level near Tran Quang Trung’s house had fallen enough to allow him to bathe on the sidewalk — his first bath in a week.

His bathroom was still under three feet (one meter) of water, but Trung, dressed in just a pair of running shorts, cheerfully sudsed himself up with soap and rinsed off using a bucketful of water he managed to bring home.

“This feels fantastic,” he said. “I’m so happy, I don’t care if anyone peeks at me.”

Associated Press writer Vu Tien Hong contributed to this report.

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hxIa8SlpURJY2Ei0bTV5vxvwUkZAD949FO100

Vietnam: Worst rain in 35 yrs

Hanoi – Pumps ran non-stop in the Vietnamese capital on Wednesday to clear water following the city’s worst rainfall in 35 years, in storms that sparked flooding across large sections of the country and left 92 people dead.

Life in Hanoi was slowly returning to normal after a halt in the rains, with floodwaters receding and residents cleaning up their homes.

Another seven bodies were found in northern Vietnam, including two more in the capital, bringing the death toll in Hanoi to 22 and the overall toll to 92, authorities said.

Neighbourhoods submerged

Forecasters said that rain over the weekend was Hanoi’s heaviest in 35 years.

At the height of the flooding, more than 100 Hanoi neighbourhoods were under at least 30cm of water, but by Wednesday only five neighborhoods were submerged, said Nguyen Anh Tu of the city’s drainage company.

“Our main pump station is running 24 hours a day, pumping 4 million cubic meters of excess water a day,” he said.

“We hope the water will recede completely from metropolitan Hanoi in the next two days.”

Cleaning out mud, debris and garbage

Only scattered showers were predicted in Hanoi for the next few days, forecasters said.

Hanoi residents, meanwhile, continued cleaning homes covered with a mix of mud, debris and garbage washed in by the floods.

Nguyen Van Hai, 34, and his family of three moved back home on Wednesday after spending five days with his in-laws.

He had taken the day off to clean his house.

“Our first floor is covered with 10cm of mud,” he said. “It’s so smelly.”

Five more bodies were found late on Tuesday in two northern provinces near Hanoi, Thai Nguyen and Bac Giang.

– AP

http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_2421311,00.html

Rain stops in Vietnam but flood toll rises to 92

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Pumps ran nonstop in the Vietnamese capital Wednesday to clear water following the city’s worst rainfall in 35 years, in storms that sparked flooding across large sections of the country and left 92 people dead.

Life in metropolitan Hanoi was slowly returning to normal after a halt in the rains, with floodwaters receding and residents cleaning up their homes.

Another seven bodies were found in northern Vietnam, including two more in the capital, bringing the death toll in Hanoi to 22 and the overall toll to 92, authorities said.

Forecasters said rain over the weekend was the heaviest Hanoi has experienced in 35 years. At the height of the flooding, more than 100 Hanoi neighborhoods were under at least a foot of water, but by Wednesday only five neighborhoods were still submerged, said Nguyen Anh Tu of the city’s drainage company.

“Our main pump station is running 24 hours a day, pumping 4 million cubic meters (141 million cubic feet) of excess water a day,” he said. “We hope the water will recede completely from metropolitan Hanoi in the next two days.”

Forecasters said people living in Hanoi can expect scattered showers in the coming days.

Hanoi residents meanwhile continued to clear out the mud, debris and garbage that was washed into their homes by the floods.

Nguyen Van Hai, 34, and his family of three moved back to their home Wednesday after spending five days with his in-laws. He had taken the day off the clean his house.

“Our first floor is covered with 10 centimeters (4 inches) of mud,” he said. “It’s so smelly.”

More than 37,000 evacuees in two rural districts of Hanoi cannot yet return to their homes, disaster officials said.

Le Thi Kim Thuy, a disaster official in Hanoi’s My Duc District, said more than 12,000 people there abandoned homes when the rain started last Thursday.

“Their homes are still up to three feet (one meter) under water,” Thuy said. “They is a shortage of everything from food to water.”

In the neighboring district of Chuong My, the homes of more than 25,000 villagers remained submerged, disaster official Nguyen Dung Trung said.

Trung said the flood water level had dropped only a few inches over the past two days and that four villages remained surrounded by water and were accessible only by boat.

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hxIa8SlpURJY2Ei0bTV5vxvwUkZAD948OQJO0

Flood chaos in China and Vietnam

It was the heaviest rain in Vietnam for decades

It was the heaviest rain in Vietnam for decades

The toll from flooding and landslides in Vietnam and south China is rising, with at least 51 dead in China and reports of 92 dead in Vietnam.

In the Vietnamese capital, Hanoi, a clean-up is beginning after floods swept across the north of the country.

Parts of south-western China have been hit by the worst flooding in more than a century, Chinese state media said.

Heavy rain over the past 10 days has caused landslides and mud-rock flows in the province of Yunnan.

At least 43 people are missing in China’s south-west, official media reported.

Century’s worst

The China Daily newspaper said the downpours in Guangxi province caused the worst floods in its capital Nanning since 1907.

Hundreds of soldiers, police and medical teams have been sent to the flooded areas, along with rice and clothing for the victims.

More than 60,000 people have been evacuated from their homes since Tuesday, state media added.

In Kunming, the capital of Yunnan, four people died and torrents of mud have flowed through towns and villages elsewhere, the China Daily said.

Heavy storms have blocked roads, destroyed crops and homes, damaged reservoirs and dams, and caused $100m (£63m) in economic damage, state media said.

Vietnam clean-up

Weather forecasters in Vietnam said the country had suffered the worst rains in 35 years.

At least 74 people are confirmed to have died in the floods in Hanoi and northern Vietnam in over a week of heavy rain – though the Associated Press news agency quotes Vietnamese authorities as saying the total had risen to 92 people.

Life is returning to normal in the capital as a huge clean-up gets under way.

Residents found more than 30cm (1ft) of mud in their homes at the height of the flooding.

Pumping stations are at work removing millions of cubic metres of water from the capital’s neighbourhoods.

Dykes across the Red River delta, intended to protect the capital city, have been a focus of concern, with troops on standby.

Although the region suffers annual deluges, this year counts among the worst experienced in recent years.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7710105.stm

Death toll continues to rise from Vietnam floods

The Associated Press
Tuesday, November 4, 2008

An elderly woman being evacuated Tuesday from her flooded home in Hanoi. (Chitose Suzuki/The Associated Press)

An elderly woman being evacuated Tuesday from her flooded home in Hanoi. (Chitose Suzuki/The Associated Press)

HANOI: Tran Xuan Mien spent an entire day clearing mud and debris out of his flooded house – only to watch the water rush back into his living room Tuesday.

“I’m exhausted,” said Mien, 62, who lives in Vietnam’s capital, Hanoi. “My house is full of water again.”

After a respite from the rain for much of Monday, showers resumed in northern and central Vietnam on Tuesday and the death toll from days of flooding continued to rise.

The authorities announced that they had recovered 19 more bodies, bringing the total to 85.

Meanwhile, residents of the capital, where forecasters said rains were the heaviest in 35 years, attempted to clean up.

Mien hoisted his washing machine, refrigerator and two motorbikes onto piles of bricks to keep them out of the water.

“I’ve been living here since 1984, but I’ve never seen rain like this,” he said.

Forecasters predicted several more days of rain but said it would be lighter than the downpours that soaked the region over the weekend.

With swollen rivers and lakes across the Red River Delta, the authorities remained concerned that dikes could break. Some 9,000 soldiers were deployed to make emergency repairs.

Another 6,000 people were sent to help 35,000 households affected by the floods in Hanoi, where 23 neighborhoods remained under at least a foot of water Tuesday.

Water levels were lower in Hanoi on Tuesday, but schools remained closed and in some areas, garbage and debris floated into flooded homes.

“My house is still surrounded by water, and it smells horrible,” said Nguyen Thi Lien, 67. “We have limited water, just for cooking, and we haven’t had a bath in four days.”

The Vietnamese authorities were concerned about possible outbreaks of waterborne diseases, said Nguyen Huy Nga of the Health Ministry.

“Diarrhea, cholera and typhoid could occur after a week of flooding, and dengue fever is also a concern,” Nga said.

Flooding in central Vietnam has killed 41 people, while 44 have died in northern provinces, including 20 people in Hanoi.

Although the rains have eased in the central region, flooding continued to cut off some isolated areas.

“Roads to those villages are still under water,” said Pham Viet Phu, a disaster official in the worst-hit province, Nghe An.

“The death toll could rise.”

Death toll continues to rise from Vietnam floods – International Herald Tribune

Floods frustrate Vietnamese, heavy rains continue

People struggle to go through a flooded street in Hanoi, Vietnam, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2008. Much of Vietnams capital remained under water Sunday as the death toll from the citys worst flooding in two decades climbed to 17, disaster officials and state media reported. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

People struggle to go through a flooded street in Hanoi, Vietnam, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2008. Much of Vietnam's capital remained under water Sunday as the death toll from the city's worst flooding in two decades climbed to 17, disaster officials and state media reported. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Tran Xuan Mien spent an entire day clearing mud and debris out of his flooded house — only to watch the water rush back into his living room Tuesday.

“I’m exhausted,” said Mien, 62, who lives in Vietnam’s capital Hanoi. “My house is full of water again.”

After a respite from the rain for much of Monday, showers resumed in northern and central Vietnam on Tuesday and the death toll from days of flooding continued to rise.

Authorities announced they had recovered 19 more bodies, bringing the total to 85.

People struggle to walk through a flooded street in Hanoi, Vietnam, Monday, Nov. 3, 2008. Rains has eased in Vietnams capital, providing a respite from days of flooding as the nations death toll from a week of storms climbed to 54. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

People struggle to walk through a flooded street in Hanoi, Vietnam, Monday, Nov. 3, 2008. Rains has eased in Vietnam's capital, providing a respite from days of flooding as the nation's death toll from a week of storms climbed to 54. (AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

Meanwhile, residents of the capital, where forecasters said rains were the heaviest in 35 years, attempted to clean up.

Mien hoisted his washing machine, refrigerator and two motorbikes onto piles of bricks to keep them out of the water. “I’ve been living here since 1984, but I’ve never seen rain like this,” he said.

Forecasters predicted several more days of rain but said it would be lighter than the downpours that soaked the region over the weekend.

With swollen rivers and lakes across the Red River Delta, authorities remained concerned that dikes could break. Some 9,000 soldiers were deployed to make emergency repairs.

Another 6,000 people were sent to help 35,000 households affected by the floods in Hanoi, where 23 neighborhoods remained under at least a foot of water Tuesday.

A vegetable seller goes through a flooded street in Hanoi,Vietnam, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2008. Much of Vietnams capital remained under water Sunday as the death toll from the citys worst flooding in two decades climbed to 17, disaster officials and state media reported.(AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

A vegetable seller goes through a flooded street in Hanoi,Vietnam, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2008. Much of Vietnam's capital remained under water Sunday as the death toll from the city's worst flooding in two decades climbed to 17, disaster officials and state media reported.(AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)

Water levels were lower in Hanoi on Tuesday, but schools remained closed and in some areas, garbage and debris floated into flooded homes.

“My house is still surrounded by water and it smells horrible,” said Nguyen Thi Lien, 67. “We have limited water, just for cooking, and we haven’t had a bath in four days.”

Vietnamese authorities were concerned about possible outbreaks of waterborne diseases, said Nguyen Huy Nga of the Health Ministry.

“Diarrhea, cholera and typhoid could occur after a week of flooding, and dengue fever is also a concern,” Nga said.

Flooding in central Vietnam has killed 41 people, while 44 have died in northern provinces, including 20 people in Hanoi.

Although the rains have eased in the central region, flooding continued to cut off some isolated areas.

“Roads to those villages are still under water,” said Pham Viet Phu, a disaster official in the worst-hit province Nghe An. “The death toll could rise.”

The Associated Press: Floods frustrate Vietnamese, heavy rains continue